This is phenomenally awesome, I kid you not. Serialism, musicality, philosophy, art, animation, what is there not to like about this? Oh and lovely hands too.

Larry Clinton and his Orchestra Heart and Soul--1938, Hoagy Harmichael
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19 Plays
[Flash 9 is required to listen to audio.]
19 Plays
Diz Doits.

Diz Doits.

The patron saint of this blog, Paul Hindemith, author of Elementary Training for Musicians, my main theory textbook. That sight reading stuff whipped me into shape!

The patron saint of this blog, Paul Hindemith, author of Elementary Training for Musicians, my main theory textbook. That sight reading stuff whipped me into shape!

// SIMULTANEOUS RECAPITULATION//

herm-anna37:

Stretto

Melismatic runs

Recurring themes

Hocketing

-0\/0-

Music major/composer porn. Whisper these into my ear (knowing well what they all mean) and I’m yours

as if I wasn’t already

(Source: internalodyssey)

herm-anna37:

jtotheizzoe:

The Science of Why Adele’s ‘Someone Like You’ Makes Everyone Cry
Tension, resolution, and the ever important “buildy-ness” (which is a term I invented but is accurate), these are the characteristics behind the most extreme emotional reactions to songs:

Twenty years ago, the British psychologist John Sloboda conducted a simple experiment. He asked music lovers to identify passages of songs that reliably set off a physical reaction, such as tears or goose bumps. Participants identified 20 tear-triggering passages, and when Dr. Sloboda analyzed their properties, a trend emerged: 18 contained a musical device called an “appoggiatura.”
An appoggiatura is a type of ornamental note that clashes with the melody just enough to create a dissonant sound. “This generates tension in the listener,” said Martin Guhn, a psychologist at the University of British Columbia who co-wrote a 2007 study on the subject. “When the notes return to the anticipated melody, the tension resolves, and it feels good.”
Chills often descend on listeners at these moments of resolution. When several appoggiaturas occur next to each other in a melody, it generates a cycle of tension and release. This provokes an even stronger reaction, and that is when the tears start to flow.

There’s just about the most detailed scientific analysis of a Grammy-winning song ever at the link.
(via WSJ.com)

Onslaught of music-theory hormonal reactions…
The post is the same as before, but the picture helps to clarify the meaning. Good and helpful picture! YAY FUCK YEAH MUSIC THEORY!
Wait is there that blog? If not…..
zzzipannng!

OK, well we have it now… Booyeah! Music Theory!

herm-anna37:

jtotheizzoe:

The Science of Why Adele’s ‘Someone Like You’ Makes Everyone Cry

Tension, resolution, and the ever important “buildy-ness” (which is a term I invented but is accurate), these are the characteristics behind the most extreme emotional reactions to songs:

Twenty years ago, the British psychologist John Sloboda conducted a simple experiment. He asked music lovers to identify passages of songs that reliably set off a physical reaction, such as tears or goose bumps. Participants identified 20 tear-triggering passages, and when Dr. Sloboda analyzed their properties, a trend emerged: 18 contained a musical device called an “appoggiatura.”

An appoggiatura is a type of ornamental note that clashes with the melody just enough to create a dissonant sound. “This generates tension in the listener,” said Martin Guhn, a psychologist at the University of British Columbia who co-wrote a 2007 study on the subject. “When the notes return to the anticipated melody, the tension resolves, and it feels good.”

Chills often descend on listeners at these moments of resolution. When several appoggiaturas occur next to each other in a melody, it generates a cycle of tension and release. This provokes an even stronger reaction, and that is when the tears start to flow.

There’s just about the most detailed scientific analysis of a Grammy-winning song ever at the link.

(via WSJ.com)

Onslaught of music-theory hormonal reactions…

The post is the same as before, but the picture helps to clarify the meaning. Good and helpful picture! YAY FUCK YEAH MUSIC THEORY!

Wait is there that blog? If not…..

zzzipannng!

OK, well we have it now… Booyeah! Music Theory!

(via internalodyssey)

Theory Geeks Unite!